Ride & Handling

Ride quality — an aspect where the last 300 excelled — remains good in either trim level. The suspension soaks up bumps well, isolating the cabin most of the time. Alas, it's no match for the car's weight. The 300 feels less nose-heavy than much of its front-drive competition, but charge hard into a corner and it pitches off-balance, with mushy steering that inspires little confidence in negotiating the curve.

Fortunately, Chrysler packages the 300's optional 20-inch wheels with a firmer, Touring suspension and 25 percent quicker steering. Indeed, the flatter cornering and sharper turn-in suit the car's dynamics much better. It's not quite as well-mannered as the Hyundai Genesis, but you'll drive more confidently with this setup. The tradeoff comes in a firmer ride — it picks up more rhythm over bumpy pavement — and higher steering effort around parking lots, but I didn't find either aspect objectionable.

    See also:

    Precautions While Driving With ACC
    In certain driving situations, ACC may have detection issues. In these cases, ACC may brake late or unexpectedly. The driver needs to stay alert and may need to intervene. ...

    Engine Block Heater — If Equipped
    The engine block heater warms the engine, and permits quicker starts in cold weather. Connect the cord to a standard 110-115 Volt AC electrical outlet with a grounded, three-wire extension cord. ...

    Enhanced Accident Response System
    In the event of an impact causing air bag deployment, if the communication network remains intact, and the power remains intact, depending on the nature of the event the ORC will determine wheth ...