Ride & Handling

Ride quality — an aspect where the last 300 excelled — remains good in either trim level. The suspension soaks up bumps well, isolating the cabin most of the time. Alas, it's no match for the car's weight. The 300 feels less nose-heavy than much of its front-drive competition, but charge hard into a corner and it pitches off-balance, with mushy steering that inspires little confidence in negotiating the curve.

Fortunately, Chrysler packages the 300's optional 20-inch wheels with a firmer, Touring suspension and 25 percent quicker steering. Indeed, the flatter cornering and sharper turn-in suit the car's dynamics much better. It's not quite as well-mannered as the Hyundai Genesis, but you'll drive more confidently with this setup. The tradeoff comes in a firmer ride — it picks up more rhythm over bumpy pavement — and higher steering effort around parking lots, but I didn't find either aspect objectionable.

    See also:

    Flash-To-Pass
    You can signal another vehicle with your headlights by lightly pulling the multifunction lever toward you. This will turn on the high beam headlights until the lever is released. ...

    Seat Belt Maintenance
    Do not bleach, dye, or clean the belts with chemical solvents or abrasive cleaners. This will weaken the fabric. Sun damage can also weaken the fabric. If the belts need cleaning, use MOPAR Total ...

    Chassis
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